Measuring the Impacts of Security Interventions

Outline
Team
Outputs
Events
  • Expected start date:
    2014•06•01
    Expected end date:
    2015•07•31
    Institute:
    UNU Office at the United Nations
    Project Status:
    Closed
    Project Type:
    Research
    Project Manager :
    James Cockayne

    The complexity of contemporary security interventions relating to drugs, organized crime, rule of law and countering violent extremism (CVE), and the climate of fiscal austerity, both underline the need to strengthen the assessment of effectiveness in those interventions. Identifying and demonstrating impact is not easy. Indeed, many of the metrics currently used to measure security intervention outcomes are arguably not fit for purpose. Innovative new technologies, techniques and methods are, however, emerging.

    The Office of Rule of Law and Security Institutions (OROLSI), within the UN’s Department of Peacekeeping Operations at UN Headquarters, is one of several actors involved in efforts to strengthen security institutions and the rule of law in post-conflict and crisis-affected states. The UNU Office in New York and OROLSI collaborated on an analytical effort to produce a confidential ‘strategy non-paper’ for OROLSI’s internal use.

    The UNU ONY project aims to, on the one hand, provide elements of strategic thinking about practical steps that OROLSI might take to strengthen its current service offerings, approach and impact, and, on the other, explore new approaches to the assessment of an array of security interventions.

    This project includes a Strategy Non-Paper entitled Seeds of Change, a desk review of the range of metrics and collection methods across security interventions, and a two-day workshop that will 1. explore innovative research on, and approaches to, intervention assessment, monitoring, and evaluation (M&E) in the fields of rule of law, organized crime, drug policy, and countering violent extremism; and 2. Address measuring success in inter-agency organized crime programming, with a particular focus on fragile contexts.