Favretto, Nicola

Project Officer

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UNU Publications
Projects
  • Nicola Favretto
    INSTITUTE:
    UNU-INWEH

    Education

    • Ph.D. in Environmental Sustainability, University of Leeds, UK
    • MSc International Economic Integration (First-Class Honours), Universita’ degli studi di Pavia, Italy
    • BSc Economics and Social Sciences (First-Class Honours), Universita’ degli studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy

    Biographical Statement

    Dr Nicola Favretto is an environmental economist with expertise on sustainable land management, bioenergy, rural development and poverty reduction. He has led and implemented a range of multi-disciplinary and multi-level research projects across Africa and Latin America, with focus on policy analysis and advice, capacity building and participatory livelihood impact assessments. He has worked across various international organisations and policy-facing institutions, including the United Nations University, Canada, United Nations Development Programme, NY, European Commission, Belgium, and academia, including the University of Leeds, UK. He is the Project Coordinator of the global Initiative on the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD) at UNU-INWEH, where he manages the scientific coordination of the initiative across multiple countries. Since 2014 he led and / or contributed to the development, coordination and implementation of capacity-building activities, including the 2015 ELD Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on stakeholder engagement, with 1,200 registered participants, and the 2017 MOOC – under development – on integrated landscape management and sustainable business models developed for Commonland, a private company that promotes large-scale landscape restoration worldwide. Dr Favretto authored over 20 publications including peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, conference papers and policy briefs. He is a Steering Committee Member and author for the Global Land Outlook of the UNCCD, and an Associate Member of the Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) of the London School of Economics and University of Leeds, UK.

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    Reports