Do International Organizations Really Advance the “Rule of Law”

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  • DATE / TIME :
    2013•09•10    18:30 - 19:30
    Location :
    Tokyo

    The United Nations, and other international organizations, are widely seen as instruments to promote the “rule of law.”

    But is advancing the rule of law at the national level (as through ambitious peacekeeping efforts) comparable to advancing it globally, among and within international organizations? To the extent that the rule of law presumes adherence to the law, as well as accountability and consistency, do international organizations like the UN really adhere to the rule of law?

    On Tuesday, 10 September 2013, José Enrique Alvarez, professor of international law at the New York University School of Law, will give a presentation and engage in a dialogue with the event moderator, UNU Rector Dr. David Malone, on the question “Do International Organizations Really Advance the ‘Rule of Law’?”

    This event (which will be in English only) is open to the public, but advance registration is required. Please click on the REGISTER button above to access the online registration page.

    A light buffet will be served after the dialogue, where you will be given a chance to interact further with Professor Alvarez and Dr. Malone.

    About the presenter

    Prof. José Enrique Alvarez is the Herbert and Rose Rubin Professor of International Law at New York University School of Law. Prior to joining NYU, he was Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy and executive director of the Center on Global Legal Problems at Columbia Law School, a professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School, an associate professor at the George Washington University National Law Center, and an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law Center. He previously was an attorney adviser with the Office of the Legal Adviser, US Department of State.

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    2F Reception Room
    United Nations University
    53-70, Jingumae 5-chome
    Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8925