A new platform for transfer of green technology

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Event
  • DATE / TIME :
    2011•05•31    14:30 - 16:00
    Location :
    Yokohama

    This seminar — “Will Green Technology Package Platform (GTPP) Encourage the Transfer of Environmental Technologies?” — looks at the GTPP, proposed by JIPA and WIPO, as a new platform for technology transfer of green technology.

    This seminar — “Will Green Technology Package Platform (GTPP) Encourage the Transfer of Environmental Technologies?” — explores the possibility of a GTPP, as proposed by the Japan Intellectual Property Association (JIPA) and World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), as a new platform for technology transfer of green technology.

    Intellectual property (IP) issues were heavily discussed at the recent climate change negotiations in Copenhagen (COP16) and in Cancun (COP17), even though this issue was not mentioned in their final reports. IP is an area in which the interests and viewpoints of developing countries conflict with those of developed countries. In addition, discussions over a theoretical legal question (i.e., TRIPS (trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights) compatibility and the use of a compulsory licensing system for environment technologies) has not reached an established consensus.

    In this context, JIPA and WIPO plan to launch a database for developing countries. The database, which will be administered by WIPO and is expected to be supported by other UN agencies, will include both the supply and demand sides of such technologies. The question, however, is whether the database can attract a sufficient amount of protected information from technology holders on a voluntary basis. Because the database is not a bundle of information that is compulsorily obtained, it will not function effectively without the provision of incentives to participate, such as monetary or reputational rewards, or whatever might induce the voluntary provision of technology information from technology holders. In addition, the demand side (i.e., developing countries) is required to provide specifics about the technologies that it actually requires; if a developing country has  not achieved a certain technical level, it may not be able to clarify its  own needs.

    As members of the international community (developing countries, in particular) increasingly request the transfer of environmental technologies under affordable conditions, the new system will attract a great deal of attention. The key issue is whether the new system can accommodate a sufficient number and quality of protected information, voluntarily contributed from technology holders, as well as the willing cooperation of technology holders to overcome practical difficulties when implementing such technologies in a country with lower technological absorption abilities.

    Other issues likely be covered in the seminar include the implications for corporate social responsibility (CSR), the responsibilities of countries at various developmental, economic, and industrial levels, the implications for the intellectual property system, and the role of international organizations.

    For more information, or to register to attend, see the seminar web page on the UNU-IAS website.